Tuesday, January 2, 2018

11 Tips For Winterizing Your Home

It is the 2nd day of January, 2018 and we are experiencing some brutally cold temperatures with sub-zero wind chills.  We’re not prepared for these types of weather conditions here in the Deep South.  The news is stating that this is the coldest weather we have seen here in years.  



We live in a 130+ year old farmhouse and, although we completely renovated the house prior to moving in, there are always steps that we can all take to winterize our homes.  Here are 11 tips that can help keep your electric bills down and your house warm…

·       Hopefully, you had your HVAC technician out to inspect your heating unit prior to turning it on.  If you haven’t, consider scheduling an appointment asap to ensure your heater is working at optimum efficiency.   Be sure to replace your furnace filter every month during the Winter months to help the heater work more effectively.  Also, make sure all of your cold air returns aren’t blocked by furniture or furnishings. We have been using cast iron propane fireplace heaters in the living room and bedroom fireplace openings so we haven’t used our furnace for the last two years.  If you’re not using your HVAC, sealing off the floor vents help to keep drafts at bay.
·        Make sure to seal off drafty doors and windows with clear heavy plastic.   If you have multiple doors but only use one or two as entrance/egress, seal the other doors with heavy plastic as well.  You can hang thermal curtains on your windows to help prevent drafts.  Make sure that there aren’t any drafts coming in under doors.  Consider adding draft-stoppers or, simply, rolled up towels, along the bottoms of doors and windows.
·        If you have a conventional electric water heater, wrap the heater with insulation and/or heavy blankets.  If you have a gas water heater, do not do this due to dangerous safety hazards it can cause.   We have a tankless electric hot water heater, so this is a step we can skip.  Consider installing a timer on your electric water heater so it isn’t heating a whole tank of water when you don’t need it.  
·        Don’t forget your water pipes.  The hot and cold pipes should be insulated to prevent frozen pipes during the Winter months.   Our water is pumped from the natural spring a bit of a distance from the house.  Our first Winter here, we ended up with frozen pipes in the spring house.  Trying to insulate pipes in freezing weather is something I wouldn’t recommend, based on personal experience.  Hopefully, you’ve planned ahead during the warm months to assure that all of your pipes are well insulated before the temperatures drop.   Also, don’t forget the pipes in your basement or crawlspace.   Sometimes out of sight is out of mind can cause serious problems to arise.
·        How is your weather stripping around your doors and windows?   Check to make sure that it is sealing properly and, if not, replace it.
·        If you haven’t done so yet, install foam insulators behind the wall plates of light switches and electrical outlets to cut down on drafts.
·        Install a dryer vent seal to prevent cold air from entering or being drawn back into your home.  Don’t piece mill your laundry.  Do all of your loads of laundry in one day (if possible).  Use the clothes dryer for consecutive loads of laundry. This conserves the energy that would be needed to heat up the dryer several times and will generate heat in your laundry room, too.
·        If you have an attached garage, cut down on the drafts by insulating the garage walls and ceiling and only open the garage door to pull in and out.  Keep the doors closed otherwise.  And, never leave your car running (to warm up) while it is in the garage.  Carbon monoxide will be released into the house, which is extremely dangerous.
·        If you have folding attic stairs, insulate the door and, if you don’t access the attic often, seal over the opening with heavy plastic.
·        If you spend most of your time in one or two rooms, keep the doors closed to all of the other rooms (and keep the vents closed in those rooms).  Keep all of the closet doors closed.   Dress warmly and always wear socks and shoes/slippers.  This allows you to keep the thermostat set at a lower temperature.  By dressing warmly when you are inside you are less likely to raise the temperature on the thermostat.
·        If you’re cooking, try to use your oven during the colder hours of the day to help heat your home.  You can cook your meals, then re-heat when it is time to serve meals.

These are things you can do now.  Consider making a list of other things you can do to winterize your home that can be accomplished before the next Winter rolls around.  

Stay Safe & Stay Warm!!

To A Life Of Simplicity
Happy Homesteading!
~ Susan & Rick
Celtic Acres Farm


If you have a question or comment, you can leave it below, and I will do my best to respond.  Please keep your comments civil and clean.  I reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments. 




About the Author:
Susan along with her husband, Rick, are the owners of Celtic Acres Farm, an organic, self-sufficient, off-grid farm where they raise chickens, ducks, goats and a pig, rescue dogs and cats, grow their own heirloom, non-gmo produce, create handmade crafts and home décor items, and strive to live a self-sustaining lifestyle while attempting to carve out that little piece of paradise where they can live free, breathe free and commune with nature.
Celtic Acres Farms is committed to healthy animals, a greener planet, recycling-reusing-repurposing, while maintaining our rural heritage and sharing it with others. We believe that we must all lead the way to a more sustainable future while never forgetting the things of the past. 

Celtic Acres Farm Copyright © 2011–2018 All Rights Reserved


No part of this document or the related files may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, by any means (electronic, photocopying, recording, or otherwise) without the prior written permission of the author.
Please note that much of this publication is based on personal experience and anecdotal evidence. Although the author has made every reasonable attempt to achieve complete accuracy of the content, they assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. Also, you should use this information as you see fit, and at your own risk. Your particular situation may not be exactly suited to the examples illustrated here; in fact, it’s likely that they won’t be the same, and you should adjust your use of the information and recommendations accordingly.
Any trademarks, service marks, product names or named features are assumed to be the property of their respective owners, and are used only for reference. There is no implied endorsement if we use one of these terms, unless otherwise specified.

Sunday, December 31, 2017

Braving The Cold

The thermometer on the back deck was hovering right at the 18-degree mark. The pasture and back yard were covered with a heavy frost that glistened brightly in the sun.  It is a gorgeous sight but Brrrrrrrrr!, I hate the thought of going outside.

The pig and goats were all still in the barn.  The two Pyrenees were out playing.  They never seem to mind the cold.  The ducks were already in the creek, splashing about in the water.  A few chickens had ventured out into the cold morning air, but only a few.  The rest were still tucked away inside the coop.  It seemed like a perfect morning for a second cup of piping-hot herbal tea.  But, some things do not wait for the temperature to rise, or the sun to shine.  Animals have to be fed every day and farm chores are always needing to be done.   Whether it is in the teens or in the eighties, a farmer’s work is never-ending.

Today, even after waiting until 10:00 a.m., the temperature didn’t rise very much at all.  Still in the mid-twenties, with a stout wind howling, we needed to finish the decking part of the garage addition that we started yesterday.  It was a day to take heed to the advice of layering.  I pulled on a long sleeved, heavy shirt, an over-sized heavy sweater, wool socks and pants.  I added a scarf, gloves, a hat and a coat.  I looked like Randy from “A Christmas Story” all bundled up for his walk to school in the snow.  And I felt like yelling, “I can’t put my arms down.” 


Regardless of the thermometer, the cold weather attire or any other distractions, we had work to do.   Not to brag, but I am a whiz with a chop saw and I have amazing spatial recognition skills.  Okay, maybe I’m bragging a little.  *haha*  Working with 12-foot long deck boards, it was my job to carry all of the boards from the trailer to the framed addition and place them so that they lined up with the floor joists. 

My Trusty Pink Tape Measure and Pencil

Since the new garage addition is 12 x 26, I had to make cuts for each row to stagger the ends of the boards.  One reason is simple aesthetics.  The second, more important, reason is because the ends are the least stable part of the boards.  Staggering will improve the structural integrity.   We have laid flooring in many of our other houses, so flooring is a skill we have mastered.

Braving the cold weather (so cold the air compressor didn’t even work), we knocked out the remainder of the decking in less than two hours (even with having to use screws on the majority of the remaining boards).   When we finished, it was still only 25-degrees.  Brrrrrrrr!   My fingers and toes were numb by the time we came inside again.   I had to thaw out in front of the fire.  But, the decking was finished!

New Addition To The Garage

Next comes the walls…hopefully we will have a break in the weather and it will warm up a bit…

To A Life Of Simplicity
Happy Homesteading!
~ Susan & Rick
Celtic Acres Farm


If you have a question or comment, you can leave it below, and I will do my best to respond.  Please keep your comments civil and clean.  I reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments. 




About the Author:
Susan along with her husband, Rick, are the owners of Celtic Acres Farm, an organic, self-sufficient, off-grid farm where they raise chickens, ducks, goats and a pig, rescue dogs and cats, grow their own heirloom, non-gmo produce, create handmade crafts and home décor items, and strive to live a self-sustaining lifestyle while attempting to carve out that little piece of paradise where they can live free, breathe free and commune with nature.
Celtic Acres Farms is committed to healthy animals, a greener planet, recycling-reusing-repurposing, while maintaining our rural heritage and sharing it with others. We believe that we must all lead the way to a more sustainable future while never forgetting the things of the past. 

Celtic Acres Farm Copyright © 2011–2017 All Rights Reserved

No part of this document or the related files may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, by any means (electronic, photocopying, recording, or otherwise) without the prior written permission of the author.
Please note that much of this publication is based on personal experience and anecdotal evidence. Although the author has made every reasonable attempt to achieve complete accuracy of the content, they assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. Also, you should use this information as you see fit, and at your own risk. Your particular situation may not be exactly suited to the examples illustrated here; in fact, it’s likely that they won’t be the same, and you should adjust your use of the information and recommendations accordingly.
Any trademarks, service marks, product names or named features are assumed to be the property of their respective owners, and are used only for reference. There is no implied endorsement if we use one of these terms, unless otherwise specified.


Friday, December 29, 2017

Each Day Is A Gift

There’s so much beauty on a farm.  Each day brings many sights, sounds and experiences that cannot be found outside of a country setting.  This morning held one of those glorious sights.

Morning on the Seine Claude Monet 1840 -1926

Right after daybreak, as the sky appeared to glow with the soft pinks, blues and yellows of a new day, I walked down and looked out over our creek.  A wispy fog rose from the surface of the water and shrouded all beyond it with a hazy, out of focus, ethereal glow.

As I stood there, mesmerized by the beauty, a squirrel scampered along the edge of water and effortlessly sprang onto one of the huge trees that grows nearby.  He leapt from branch to branch until he was so high that he disappeared from sight.

I looked back toward the water and, suddenly, I caught a glimpse of movement on the other side.  I immediately froze and squinted, trying to see what was just beyond the haze.  As things came slowly into focus, I saw two young deer timidly walking toward the water.  I held my breath and waited while they drank and passed on into a stand of trees.  It was like time stood still in those quiet moments while I watched the scene unfold.

Early mornings hold so much beauty and wonder.  How many people miss breathtaking moments like this by sleeping in or not venturing out on cold, frigid mornings?  Each brand new day holds unlimited opportunities to find the beauty and serenity that surrounds us all daily.  Embrace the world around you and find the beauty in simplicity.

“A thing of beauty is a joy forever”
John Keats (1795–1821)


To A Life Of Simplicity
Happy Homesteading!
~ Susan & Rick
Celtic Acres Farm


If you have a question or comment, you can leave it below, and I will do my best to respond.  Please keep your comments civil and clean.  I reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments. 




About the Author:
Susan along with her husband, Rick, are the owners of Celtic Acres Farm, an organic, self-sufficient, off-grid farm where they raise chickens, ducks, goats and a pig, rescue dogs and cats, grow their own heirloom, non-gmo produce, create handmade crafts and home décor items, and strive to live a self-sustaining lifestyle while attempting to carve out that little piece of paradise where they can live free, breathe free and commune with nature.
Celtic Acres Farms is committed to healthy animals, a greener planet, recycling-reusing-repurposing, while maintaining our rural heritage and sharing it with others. We believe that we must all lead the way to a more sustainable future while never forgetting the things of the past. 

Celtic Acres Farm Copyright © 2011–2017 All Rights Reserved

No part of this document or the related files may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, by any means (electronic, photocopying, recording, or otherwise) without the prior written permission of the author.
Please note that much of this publication is based on personal experience and anecdotal evidence. Although the author has made every reasonable attempt to achieve complete accuracy of the content, they assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. Also, you should use this information as you see fit, and at your own risk. Your particular situation may not be exactly suited to the examples illustrated here; in fact, it’s likely that they won’t be the same, and you should adjust your use of the information and recommendations accordingly.
Any trademarks, service marks, product names or named features are assumed to be the property of their respective owners, and are used only for reference. There is no implied endorsement if we use one of these terms, unless otherwise specified.



Thursday, December 28, 2017

Nature Rewards Those Who Love Her Most

While out for dinner on Tuesday evening, our waitress, Kim, kept coming by our table to check on us and to chat.  At one point in the conversation, she made a joke about our farm.  Nothing malicious, merely something that seemed extremely funny to a nineteen year old.

She said, “since you have chickens, that makes you a “chicken-tender”.”  haha, cute, right?  But that started me thinking about the whole concept of “tending” as the phrase was used so many years ago.  Stewardship of the land (or tending the flock) have both agricultural and religious connotations that have broad, far-reaching implications to us all. 


I have always had a love of animals – all animals – and, in my wildest dreams as a child, I never would have imagined that I would finally reach a point in my life where I could buy a farm, renovate a 130 year old farmhouse, raise livestock, live relatively off-grid and become a true steward of the land.
 “Whatever you do to the animals, you do to yourself.” ― Ben MikaelsenTouching Spirit Bear

The stewardship of the land and livestock are both a responsibility and a privilegeWe should always leave an amount of land as it is, providing sanctuary and a native habitat for any wild animals that find their way onto and through our property.  We also leave "pockets" of undisturbed sections for our livestock as well.  We have an area of hillside that we leave untouched.  Since living here, we have seen several groundhogs making their homes in the side of that hill.  They have raised families and remained in their dens year after year.  They travel the short distance down to our creek for water and remain outside of the pasture fence where we keep the goats, pig and Pyrenees.  We live in harmony with these, and so many other creatures, that pass through our land.

Small changes, when combined together over time, maintain the integrity and sustainability of the land.  When we learn to care for the system as a whole, by managing the individual ecosystems (water, soil, air, livestock, crops, landscape) with holistic methods, we are becoming good stewards.  We need to understand that by living in harmony with nature, we begin to mimic the natural, continuous cycles of renewal of all of the resources we are attempting to conserve.  Our land practices should positively impact the land as a whole and both directly and indirectly affect the flora and fauna of other adjoining landowners as well.
“When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.”  -- Aldo Leopold 
We are truly blessed to have been given the opportunity to be at one with nature.  Every new day is a new adventure.  By enjoying life to the fullest every day, we are able to experience all that nature has to offer which, in turn, sparks joy and wonder and excitement in the life we have chosen to live.   There is always something new each day that I open the door and head to the barn first thing in the morning…whether it is the sound of a bird chirping, or a rooster crowing, or the sound of the ducks splashing in the creek, the smell of a nearby wood-stove wafting on the breeze, or any one of a hundred more sensory triggers that evoke a feeling…every day is definitely a new adventure waiting to be embraced. 
 “Land stewardship is the conservation of your property's natural resources and features over a long period of time. Stewardship motives are altruistic, as you also want to be a good neighbor, one who shares concern for the lands that surround yours and the water that travels downstream from your property.
Many consider the late Aldo Leopold to be the father of modern conservation theory and practice. Leopold believed that land stewardship was not only rooted in conservation but also involved ethics, or the search for a higher meaning. He wrote that all ethics rest upon the single premise "...that the individual is a member of a community of interdependent parts. The land ethic simply enlarges the boundaries of the community to include soils, waters, plants, animals, or collectively: the land." This is to say that once we understand that humans are not separate from, but are part of and depend on the natural community, we will develop an ethic to care for the community as a whole.“ – Sargent, M.S and Carter, K.S., ed. 1999. Managing Michigan Wildlife: A Landowners Guide

daviscofood

To A Life Of Simplicity
Happy Homesteading!
~ Susan & Rick
Celtic Acres Farm




If you have a question or comment, you can leave it below, and I will do my best to respond.  Please keep your comments civil and clean.  I reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments. 



About the Author:
Susan along with her husband, Rick, are the owners of Celtic Acres Farm, an organic, self-sufficient, off-grid farm where they raise chickens, ducks, goats and a pig, rescue dogs and cats, grow their own heirloom, non-gmo produce, create handmade crafts and home décor items, and strive to live a self-sustaining lifestyle while attempting to carve out that little piece of paradise where they can live free, breathe free and commune with nature.
Celtic Acres Farms is committed to healthy animals, a greener planet, recycling-reusing-repurposing, while maintaining our rural heritage and sharing it with others. We believe that we must all lead the way to a more sustainable future while never forgetting the things of the past. 

Celtic Acres Farm Copyright © 2011–2017 All Rights Reserved



No part of this document or the related files may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, by any means (electronic, photocopying, recording, or otherwise) without the prior written permission of the author.
Please note that much of this publication is based on personal experience and anecdotal evidence. Although the author has made every reasonable attempt to achieve complete accuracy of the content, they assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. Also, you should use this information as you see fit, and at your own risk. Your particular situation may not be exactly suited to the examples illustrated here; in fact, it’s likely that they won’t be the same, and you should adjust your use of the information and recommendations accordingly.
Any trademarks, service marks, product names or named features are assumed to be the property of their respective owners, and are used only for reference. There is no implied endorsement if we use one of these terms, unless otherwise specified.

Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Say Goodbye Again To Another Year

Another Christmas is officially over (thank goodness) and we will soon be welcoming in a brand-new year.  A new year filled with hope and wonder and infinite possibilities.  A clean slate on which we will write the next 365 days.  I’m looking forward to a new year – one filled with laughter, happiness, joy, peace, love, creativity, commitment and harmony with unlimited accomplishments, dreams and goals attained.



I want to enjoy my life, to relish in the beauty and happiness of day-to-day living, without all of the negative influences, distractions, influx of depressing news, commentary, gossip, pessimism and hostility that swirls around all of us 24/7.  Do we really need twenty-four hours a day of droning news?  It doesn’t matter whether you prefer the left, or right, leaning news channels, it’s time to turn off the televisions, radios and computers and go outside, or read a book, or listen to music, or create something with your own two hands, or simply commune with nature in silence – spend time enjoying life without all of the negative artificial influences.

I have very deep, strong convictions, beliefs, values and opinions.  Just as I have the rights to my beliefs, I also believe that others have the right to their own beliefs as well.  Just because I respect everyone’s rights to embrace their own opinions, that does not mean that I want, need or desire to read or hear those said opinions, ad-nauseam, in my news, facebook or twitter feeds or in daily physical conversations and interactions.

At the inception of social media venues, the main focus was “social” -- interactions, friendships, common interests, meeting new people, developing new skills in a common exchange of ideas and expanding our views and social circles.   Sadly, over time, it has dissolved into a collective group demonstrating arrogant, narcissistic personality traits, including egotistical, conceited, grandiose behaviors prone to constant complaining, fighting, flaming, arguments, insults and other negative exchanges that I, for one, do not want or need in my life.  I have not personally heard of even one example of someone’s opinion being changed simply by someone else’s “social” tirade or argument. 

In the new year, I am going to spend less time staring at a computer screen or watching a television and spend more time in the real world.  I look forward to experiencing life – real life – with all of the sights, sounds, tastes, smells, feelings and emotions connected with all the wonders that surround us daily.   I don’t want to just exist – I want to live.  It’s time for me to get out, explore, allow curiosity to flourish, broaden my spirituality, be open to new ideas and experiences, see the synchronicity in the random, step outside of my comfort zone, find passion for what I really love, challenge authority, challenge myself, evolve, change, express gratitude, to keep moving and never stop and always follow the road less traveled.

Every day is a new day, filled with new adventures.  Yesterday is just that – yesterday – and nothing can change it.   But, today – today is filled with endless possibilities.  It’s time to stop sleepwalking through life and to actually experience it.  It’s time to stop putting life on hold.   “Someday” will never arrive unless you strive to make it happen with every fiber of your being.  Do the things you love.  Tomorrow isn’t guaranteed.  Today is the day – so get up, get out and go do something!

Let go of the past.  Let go of expectations.  Forgive those who have hurt you.  Spend more time with the people who love you and support you.  Find the deeper connections instead of the superficial interactions that don’t feed your soul in the long-term.  Strive to do some good deed every day.   Learn something new every day.  Create something.   Never settle.  Live in the moment and relish the little personal moments that fuel your soul.

“Your time is limited, don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma, which is living the result of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of other’s opinion drown your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition, they somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.” – Steve Jobs



There is just so much beauty and wonder and knowledge all around us if we simply take the time to look and to “live-the-questions” rather than reaching for “ready-made answers.”  It is time for me to follow my bliss and live my best life, day after day, allowing my life to speak for itself.  


The purpose of life is to live it, isn’t it?   

Copyright © 2017 All Rights Reserved


To A Life Of Simplicity
Happy Homesteading!
~ Susan & Rick
Celtic Acres Farm




If you have a question or comment, you can leave it below, and I will do my best to respond.  Please keep your comments civil and clean.  I reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments. 



About the Author:
Susan along with her husband, Rick, are the owners of Celtic Acres Farm, an organic, self-sufficient, off-grid farm where they raise chickens, ducks, goats and a pig, rescue dogs and cats, grow their own heirloom, non-gmo produce, create handmade crafts and home décor items, and strive to live a self-sustaining lifestyle while attempting to carve out that little piece of paradise where they can live free, breathe free and commune with nature.
Celtic Acres Farms is committed to healthy animals, a greener planet, recycling-reusing-repurposing, while maintaining our rural heritage and sharing it with others. We believe that we must all lead the way to a more sustainable future while never forgetting the things of the past. 

Celtic Acres Farm Copyright © 2011–2017 All Rights Reserved



No part of this document or the related files may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, by any means (electronic, photocopying, recording, or otherwise) without the prior written permission of the author.
Please note that much of this publication is based on personal experience and anecdotal evidence. Although the author has made every reasonable attempt to achieve complete accuracy of the content, they assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. Also, you should use this information as you see fit, and at your own risk. Your particular situation may not be exactly suited to the examples illustrated here; in fact, it’s likely that they won’t be the same, and you should adjust your use of the information and recommendations accordingly.
Any trademarks, service marks, product names or named features are assumed to be the property of their respective owners, and are used only for reference. There is no implied endorsement if we use one of these terms, unless otherwise specified.

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Walking In A Winter Wonderland

Our Old Truck and Tractor

As many of you already know, snow is not a common occurrence in the South.   Thursday evening, the local weather forecasters were all saying that we would see cold temps and, perhaps, a dusting of snow on the grassy areas.  They all said there was nothing to worry yourself over.

When I got up a little before 5:00 a.m. on Friday morning to let Sophie and Otto out to potty, the snow was already coming down.  As the sun came up, we could see the farm turning into a Winter Wonderland.  Based on the local weather forecasters, who were still saying “no true accumulation,” it sounded like we were going to see a “pretty landscape” but no dangers.

As the day progressed, so did the snow, with no indication of letting up at all.  The snow was weighing down on the limbs and power lines and, after a few hours of heavy snow, the electricity went out.
Plum Tree Draped In Snow

After the mandatory minute of no electricity, I heard our solar battery backup turn on with a thud.  We have our kitchen (fridge, freezer, stove), the pump in the spring house for our water, the living room and the master bedroom wired into the secondary breaker box which is serviced through the battery backup.  We also have two cast iron stoves (one in the bedroom and one in the living room) that are propane.  With everyone around us without electricity, heat and water, we had it all.  Not a bad way to “rough” it.

The two Pyrenees were in their element – frolicking all over the pasture, enjoying the snow.  The goats and pig didn’t share the Pyrs excitement.  They chose to stay inside of the barn and watch the snow fall from the shelter of the barn door.

The Barn During The Snowfall


It was beautiful as it was falling and after it first fell.  We ended up with ten (10) inches of snow.  But, now, on Day 3, we have areas that have melted and some still undisturbed.  It will all soon be one soggy, muddy mess.  UGH

Thankfully, we weathered the storm with little discomfort.  For a Southern girl, born and raised, this was enough snow to last me for the duration of Winter.  No more, Mother Nature, please…

To A Life Of Simplicity
Happy Homesteading!
~ Susan & Rick
Celtic Acres Farm




If you have a question or comment, you can leave it below, and I will do my best to respond.  Please keep your comments civil and clean.  I reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments. 



About the Author:
Susan along with her husband, Rick, are the owners of Celtic Acres Farm, an organic, self-sufficient, off-grid farm where they raise chickens, ducks, goats and a pig, rescue dogs and cats, grow their own heirloom, non-gmo produce, create handmade crafts and home décor items, and strive to live a self-sustaining lifestyle while attempting to carve out that little piece of paradise where they can live free, breathe free and commune with nature.
Celtic Acres Farms is committed to healthy animals, a greener planet, recycling-reusing-repurposing, while maintaining our rural heritage and sharing it with others. We believe that we must all lead the way to a more sustainable future while never forgetting the things of the past. 

Celtic Acres Farm Copyright © 2011–2017 All Rights Reserved



No part of this document or the related files may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, by any means (electronic, photocopying, recording, or otherwise) without the prior written permission of the author.
Please note that much of this publication is based on personal experience and anecdotal evidence. Although the author has made every reasonable attempt to achieve complete accuracy of the content, they assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. Also, you should use this information as you see fit, and at your own risk. Your particular situation may not be exactly suited to the examples illustrated here; in fact, it’s likely that they won’t be the same, and you should adjust your use of the information and recommendations accordingly.
Any trademarks, service marks, product names or named features are assumed to be the property of their respective owners, and are used only for reference. There is no implied endorsement if we use one of these terms, unless otherwise specified.

Friday, December 1, 2017

Rescues Rock

We have been rescuing dogs and cats longer than the term “rescue” was even a thing.  We have been blessed with so much unconditional love over the years.

Our newest rescue, Otto, is a challenge, to say the least.  He is still a puppy, if you can call a muscular 70-pound beast a puppy.  He is less than a year old and has only been with us for a few months.  He suffers from severe separation anxiety which, when translated, equals a lot of destruction.  I think he could destroy a bowling ball in less than five minutes.
 
A rare moment -- Otto being good (sleeping)

He joined our other two indoor rescue dogs, Sophie, who is five and Charlie, who is two.  We’ve had to adjust everything throughout our daily lives, just to lessen Otto’s destructive behavior.  We can't let him into the back yard because we free-range our chickens and he killed several before we discovered his propensity for chicken-chasing.  We can’t let him into the pasture because he chases and mauls the goats.  Even a trip to the mailbox is a dangerous activity because he can destroy several things in the two minutes we’re out of the house.  We definitely do not leave him in the house when we go out.  If we did, we wouldn’t have a house when we returned.
 
Otto using Charlie as a pillow

Otto and Charlie sharing a bed


We are huge proponents of rescues.  Our motto has always been “Adopt, Don’t Shop!”  But, often times, due to the lives these animals led before they were rescued, that often means they come with a lot of issues.  It takes patience, care, understanding and lots (lots, LOTS!) of love to integrate new animals into the family.  Even through all the trials, and damages, and issues with every rescue, we wouldn’t trade the experiences for all the money in the world.

RESCUES ROCK!

To A Life Of Simplicity
Happy Homesteading!
~ Susan & Rick
Celtic Acres Farm




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About the Author:
Susan along with her husband, Rick, are the owners of Celtic Acres Farm, an organic, self-sufficient, off-grid farm where they raise chickens, ducks, goats and a pig, rescue dogs and cats, grow their own heirloom, non-gmo produce, create handmade crafts and home décor items, and strive to live a self-sustaining lifestyle while attempting to carve out that little piece of paradise where they can live free, breathe free and commune with nature.
Celtic Acres Farms is committed to healthy animals, a greener planet, recycling-reusing-repurposing, while maintaining our rural heritage and sharing it with others. We believe that we must all lead the way to a more sustainable future while never forgetting the things of the past. 

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